Read this book at your Peril

 Ten good
reasons not to read this book
 by 
R.A. Barnes
1.     
Main character. The over-riding reason you
shouldn’t read this novel (or maybe you already haven’t read it?) is Gerard
Mayes. Ger is an anti-hero. Men want to be him, women want to convert him. But
some of those anti-hero attributes should be enough to put you off.

2.     
Alpha male. If you only want to read about
dominant men then Peril isn’t for you. Ger is a slacker. Easily led by others.
But that’s not his self-image. He’s in total denial about how others see him.

3.     
Eye candy. Broad-shouldered, tall, athletic
and drop-dead gorgeous. He ain’t that. Ger is a bit short, a bit rounded, a
sandy-haired Scot who would be past his prime if he ever had one. But women –
some women – fall under his spell.

4.     
Fidelity. Faithful and dedicated to one
woman. Not Ger.
He’s having an affair with his wife’s best friend.

5.     
Clean-living. With a taste for a pint or several
and a best friend who has an expensive cocaine habit, Ger fails on this score
too.

6.     
High moral standards. The opening chapter leaves no doubts about Ger’s standards. Even his
disposal of the body is shoddy.

7.     
Good health. The only good thing about his health
is Ger doesn’t smoke. If you could read his palm the lifeline wouldn’t be long.

8.     
Intelligence. Not half as smart as he thinks he
is. The anti-hero’s attempts to outwit his blackmailer and deceive the police
can only end in disaster.

9.     
Likeable. Well, I’ll let an unfortunate reader
have their say on this one. If I’m
honest, I wanted to punch the main character in the face. Repeatedly. I wished
him nothing but suffering … I wanted to buy a plane ticket to Dublin just to hunt down Ger–a fictional
character–and kick him soundly in the bollocks.
Enough said.

10.  Conclusive. It
should be all over for Ger at the end of Peril. Having left a trail of bodies
and destroyed lives in his wake, he should get his comeuppance. But he doesn’t.
Not quite anyway.

If you have
been fortunate enough not to read Peril then you might also like to not
read the sequel Getting Out of Dodge. I can similarly
recommend not reading anything else I’ve written.

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And now, introducing that awful, awful book…
PERIL
 A moment of madness. His choices. Their lives.

Ger Mayes
doesn’t stand out from the crowd and life is passing him by. He thinks
the world owes him a living but is held back by his own minor daily
misdemeanors. That is until he kills a mugger and is blackmailed by a
vicious Romanian crime gang. Ger keeps the secret from his wife, Jo, but
bares all to her best friend, his mistress Renée. He also trusts his
pal, high-wheeling drug dealer Tom, but gets dragged out of his depth
into a world of darker deception. In a deadly struggle to cast off the
gang’s net, Ger becomes more entangled. Can he find a way out and save
those he loves?

Contemporary crime fiction set in Ireland, PERIL
is the picaresque story of an anti-hero. Men want to be him, women want
to redeem him. Ger’s story is fiction, but his origins are real –
everyday folk living and working in a Dublin city center wracked with
organized begging, drugs and violent crime. It’s not all leprechauns and
shillelaghs in Ireland.

PERIL is the first of the Ger Mayes crime fiction series.

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